You can Imagine...

...Brain Health

Brain Health

Brain Health

We have established the Avielle Foundation to address the causes of violence through a focus on brain health. We want to start using this term, brain health, because mental health is intangible – it comes with some degree of fear and trepidation. But we know there are real, physical manifestations within the brain that can be imaged, measured, quantified, and understood – We can work with that, and then, we can fix it.

Objective #1:  To Understand Brain Pathologies Leading to Violent Behaviors

The Avielle Foundation is working closely with world leaders in brain health research to understand why someone would engage in harmful behavior.  In the field of brain health, too little is known about what drives violent behaviors. Clearly something is wrong with a person capable of such atrocities as mass murder.  We hope to better understand the biological and environmental factors associated with these pathologies.  We can then educate healthcare providers, teachers, and other community members about identifying and responsibly advocating for those at risk of violent behaviors.  We can develop and put into practice innovative policies to facilitate counseling, education, and pharmacological interventions. Education and information will dispel any fear and trepidation associated with getting help.

Violence: Understand it to end it.

The role that nature (genetics) and nurture (environment) play on our behaviors cannot be separated. The environment influences the expression of our genes, and our genes influence how we interact with our environment.

The role that nature (genetics) and nurture (environment) play on our behaviors cannot be separated. The environment influences the expression of our genes, and our genes influence how we interact with our environment.

 

Click here to learn some interesting facts about Brain Health

 

Click here to see Objective #2: Brain Healthy Communities

 

Golgi stained pyramidal neurons (image courtesy of W. Seeley, MD, UCSF)

Golgi stained pyramidal neurons (image courtesy of W. Seeley, MD, UCSF)